The All-American Sandwich

Today, for lunch, I had a ham, chicken and cheese sandwich.

But this was not called a “ham, chicken and cheese sandwich”. This was called an “All-American Sandwich”.

And why did my sandwich deserve such a lofty promotional rebranding?

Because they also added… bacon.

America. Fuck yeah.

Interviews with Paul Tudor Jones, Louis Bacon, Bruce Kovner

I am not entirely sure where these interviews come from – I got them on an email several years ago that had been forwarded around a few times. My copy cites Stephen Taub as the interviewer.

Paul Tudor Jones II

Paul Tudor Jones II founded Tudor Investment Corp. in 1980 at the age of 25. Since then this extraordinary investor has never suffered a losing year. His old-school macro approach is built on what he calls tape-reading, which involves analyzing price trends and riding momentum – with an uncanny knack for balancing risk and return – rather than obsessing over the fundamentals, as less intuitive or less self-confident traders might. Jones’s core belief is that often prices move and trends unfold only because of investor behavior (in this he and George Soros are similar). Business schools, Jones laments, are sometimes too steeped in teaching economic postulates and market theory. Through his Robin Hood Foundation, he pours millions of dollars into antipoverty and education programs in New York City. The Memphis-born manager, who began his career as a cotton trader, first made a name for himself in 1987, when he called the market crash and rode a heavy short position in stock index futures to a 201 percent gain. Today he oversees more than $18 billion in assets. Tudor’s flagship BVI Global Fund has returned roughly 23 percent annually since its 1986 inception.
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Don’t Dismiss Office Politics: Teach It

All credit to http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904060604576570574190457198.html

 …There are generally two times in every rising executive’s career that bring the biggest tests of their ability to manage organizational politics. The first comes after about five to seven years, when the person begins to take on roles that depend less on their individual performance and more on what they can accomplish through the people around them. The second is usually after 15 to 20 years, or when the person steps into a senior role with even more visibility… there is much less room for mistakes, and technical skills are largely irrelevant for career success.

…To best evaluate a person at one of these key junctures, pay attention to whether they inspire support and confidence through how they talk and act. Leaders hold on to their positions by maintaining support from their employees, customers and, most important, their bosses.

…people who appear forceful rather than sad or uncertain typically get more status. Something as simple as interrupting can signal and create power—people with power interrupt, those without get interrupted.

Life’s Too Short to Go With The Flow‏

An interview with Ricky Gervais: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ricky-gervais/lifes-too-short-to-go-with-the-flow_b_895005.html

The man who views the world at 50 the same as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.
It may ruffle a few feathers, but some people’s feathers need a little ruffling.
And remember: just because someone is offended doesn’t mean they’re in the right.

TE Lawrence And The Match‏

He offers Potter one of Hartley’s cigarettes, and then lights it for him. A messenger, having just brought in a message for Lawrence, watches Lawrence extinguish the lighted match slowly with his fingers.

Lawrence reads the message then gathers his kit to leave. Meanwhile, Potter tries to put out a match with his fingers. It hurts and he asks Lawrence what the trick is. Lawrence replies: “The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts.